Process Mining at Deutsche Bank

50:47Recorded on 19 June 2018 at TU Eindhoven

Niyi Ogunbiyi(Deutsche Bank, United Kingdom)

Niyi started with process mining on a cold winter morning in January 2017, when he received an email from a colleague telling him about process mining. In his talk, he shared his process mining journey and the five lessons they have learned so far.

Synopsis

The second speaker at Process Mining Camp 2018 was Niyi Ogunbiyi from Deutsche Bank in the United Kingdom. Niyi is a Six Sigma Master Black Belt in the Chief Regulatory Office at Deutsche Bank.

Niyi started with process mining on a cold winter morning in January 2017, when he received an email from a colleague telling him about process mining. After searching the internet, he started the MOOC and shared his ideas with the team. They also got very excited to see what they would be able to do with it. They started with their proof of concept in October the same year. In his talk, he shared his process mining journey and the five lessons they have learned so far.

1. Be Persistent & Inventive

His first lesson was to be persistent to get the right people on board to secure the required sponsorship and the funds to get started. Also, getting the data can be challenging. Therefore, you need to be inventive and sometimes try to find other ways to get your hands on a dataset to just get started.

2. Be Clear What Process Mining Can and Can’t Do

The second lesson was to understand what process mining can, but also what it cannot do. To figure this out, they needed to take a step back and look at their current approach. Traditionally, process discovery is done by conducting interviews, which can take a lot of time. Additionally, the resulting model does not always reflect the reality. They saw that process mining could contribute to perform these analyses more quickly and with a higher precision. Another benefit was that with process mining they could test their process for conformance more easily on large data sets instead of manually reviewing process conformance manually based on a smaller sample of cases. Nevertheless, they also learned that process mining would not answer all the process-related questions and that domain expertise is required to be able to translate the insights into actions.

3. Find The Right Balance Between Targeted vs. Untargeted Exploration

When performing their analysis, they found that they were initially spending a lot of time on explorative (untargeted) analysis. While this was fun, and while it revealed a few things about the process that they would not have even thought to ask questions about, the insights from these explorations were often difficult to translate into action and were more anecdotal. In order to become more focused in their analysis they developed templates to answer questions that were relevant to their stakeholders. For example, understanding the relations between the lead time and rework and the case variations. This approach helped them to keep focusing on the relevant factors with the biggest impact. Niyi recommends to spend not more than 30% of your time on untargeted, explorative analysis and 70% on targeted, question-focused analysis, which was the third lesson.

4. Relate Analysis Results To Stakeholders’ Pain

Fourthly, in order to make the insights actionable you need to be able to relate them to the stakeholder’s pains and gains. Ideally, you can relate the analysis results to problems that otherwise keep the process manager up at night. This will really help to make them care about your analysis and they will help you to drive the actual change that needs to happen after the process mining analysis to realize the benefits. But also give them a clear understanding about the overall opportunities to improve and help them to determine if they are working on the right improvement initiatives.

5. Celebrate Your Successes and Cut Your Losses

Finally, they were able to complete the proof of concepts and continue with a number of other projects. Often, when you have completed something you immediately move on to the next. But in order to build resilience, don’t forget to also take a moment to celebrate and pat yourself on the back. Also: Be realistic and cut your losses when things don’t work out or are just too ambitions.

As a next step Niyi and his team are selecting more processes for process mining. For example, they are looking into employee trading to check conformance and the combination of process mining with RPA. Process mining is great to identify which activities would be the best candidate to automate and to estimate the benefits. Finally, they also see great potential for process mining in fraud detection and are experimenting with this.

Join us online for this year's camp!

This year's Process Mining Camp will take place online, from 15 to 24 June 2020Come join us for eight special days, and meet the global process mining community!

Find out more!

More from Process Mining Camp 2018

Deciding Surgery Room Allocations in a Hospital

Fran Batchelor (UW Health)

Fran Batchelor is a Nursing Informatics Specialist who supports the surgical services at three of UW Health’s hospitals. She used process mining to analyze the flow of urgent and emergent surgical cases added to the schedule.

Mining a Global Trade Process with Data Science

Dinesh Das (Microsoft)

Dinesh Das is the Data Science manager in Microsoft’s Core Services Engineering and Operations organization. He sees process mining as a silver bullet to achieve this and he shared his learnings and experiences based on the proof of concept on the global trade process.

Controlling Financial Processes at a Municipality

Wim Kouwenhoven (City of Amsterdam)

Wim is a program manager responsible for improving and controlling the financial function at the City of Amsterdam. He shared the five-step approach they used for introducing process mining.

Understanding Complex Development Processes

Olga Gazina (Euroclear) and Daniel Cathala (Euroclear)

As a data analyst at the internal audit department of Euroclear, Olga helped Daniel, an IT Manager, to make his life at the end of the year a bit easier by using process mining to identify key risks.

Process Mining and Jira

Marc Tollens (KLM)

As a Sunday afternoon project, Marc collected data from Jira, a project management software for (agile) software development, to see how process mining could be applied to help the teams learn from each other.

Process Miner of the Year 2018

David Baltar Boilève (Hospital Universitario Lucus Augusti)

After tackling the inevitable complexity of any healthcare process through a combination of simplification strategies, the team at HULA were able to reveal bottlenecks that, once removed, can lead to a faster cancer diagnosis.

Skills For Successful Process Scientists

Wil van der Aalst (RWTH Aachen)

The final speaker at Process Mining Camp 2018 was Wil van der Aalst, the founding father of process mining. In his closing keynote, Wil talked about the updated skill set that process and data scientists need today.

Explore Process Mining Camp 2018

© 2020 by Fluxicon BV, all rights reserved.
You can read our privacy policy here.

Page created in 25.9 ms.