Winner of BPI Challenge 2013 Announced

bpic2013-handover

At the end of yesterday’s BPI Workshop1, the winner of the BPI Challenge 2013 was announced. The award goes to Chang Jae Kang, Young Sik Kang, Yeong Shin Lee, Seonkyu Noh, Hyeong Cheol Kim, Woo Cheol Lim, Juhee Kim and Regina Hong, a team from Myongji University in Seoul, Korea. Congratulations to the winners also from us here at Fluxicon!

From the official announcement:

The jury particularly liked the analysis and found the reasoning style easy to follow. The authors made a point of clearly defining their interpretations and arguing for their assumptions. The graphs were mostly well-explained. Furthermore, the report shows a good mix of the use of process mining tools and statistical analysis tools.

BPIC 2013 Award

The BPI Challenge, which was held for the third time this year, is the most prestigious and high-profile competition for process mining and related process analytics professionals. As proud supporters and sponsors of the challenge, we here at Fluxicon wanted to create a special award trophy for the winner, signifying this achievement. The award, which you can see above, was hand-crafted by Felix Günther, after an original concept and design. It is made from a single branch of a plum tree, which symbolizes the “log” that was analyzed in the challenge. The copper inlay2 stands for the precious information that was mined from the log3.

bpic2013-ceremony

We would like to thank everyone who participated in the BPI Challenge. Winning this competition is of course a great achievement. However, as with the Olympics, the process of participation alone should make this challenge worthwhile, and it also shows your support of the process mining community. We are of course happy to see so many participating teams using Disco for their analysis, thanks a lot for that!

Last but not least, we would like to extend our thanks to the organizers and judges of the BPI Challenge, especially Boudewijn van Dongen, for a great job, and a great collaboration.

If you are curious how the various participants approached the challenge, and what they found, we have listed all submissions here for your convenience.

Update: The BPI Challenge submissions have been made available as CEUR Workshop Proceedings, along with a summary by the organizers, which includes a selection of the jury comments for each submission.


  1. Held in conjunction with the BPM Conference 2013 in Beijing, China. 
  2. Below the “BPIC 2013” engraving. 
  3. Like the precious metal ore embedded in the rock it is mined from.