ProM 6.1 Released

ProM 6

Earlier today, Eric Verbeek announced the release of ProM 6.1, the latest update to the popular open source framework for Process Mining. Eric summarizes the changes made since version 6.0 the 6.1 prerelease as follows:

  • UITopia has been updated.
  • RuntimeLTLChecker has been replaced by MoBuConLTL.
  • TestBed has been removed.
  • Cosimulation, CPnet, Declare, DeclareMiner, DottedChart, InteractiveVisualization, KeyValue, LogDialog, LTLChecker, OperationalSupport, OSEmbedder, PatternAbstractions, PNAnalysis, Replayer, Uma, Widgets, and XQueryProvider have been updated.

UPDATE: As Michael points out in the comments, the above change log refers to the prerelease version of 6.1; the changes since ProM 6.0 are more substantial, including:

moving functionality from the framework to separate packages, […] support for Declare models and colored Petri net models, [a generalized model animation feature to e.g.] animate replay of logs on transition systems, a significant update to operational support, and […] some completely new packages, including one for simplifying mined models (Uma) and much improved replay of logs on Petri nets.

Thanks for the clarification, Michael!

The development of ProM was initiated at Eindhoven University of Technology, which is still spearheading and coordinating development efforts. In the last years, researchers from more and more universities have contributed to ProM, sharing implementations of their approaches in the form of plugins, and thereby making their research reproducible and allowing other researchers to build upon their work.

ProM 6.1 is a great way to get a sneak preview into where process mining research is headed. You can use all its analysis plugins, from mature tools like the Heuristics miner to more experimental plugins, with your own data converted by Nitro.

As you probably know, researchers get paid to publish articles and teach courses, and developing software is much less appreciated and commonplace in the scientific BPM community. Therefore we would like to take this opportunity and thank the Process Mining group at TU/e, and all ProM contributors, for their hard work!

You can download ProM 6.1 executables and source code from the ProM 6 website here.