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Process Mining in IT Service Management (in German) 1

Process Mining IT Service Management

IT Service processes are a very interesting application area for process mining, because delivering great IT support for the business is crucial for any company, and because the data are usually very easy to get. ITSM systems keep records of all activities related to a ticket number, which can be used as a case ID in process mining.

The June edition of the itSM Magazin now features an article that we wrote with Dierk Söllner on the use cases of process mining in IT Service Management (in German).

The whole issue is only accessible for itSMF members, but you can download our ‘Process Mining in IT Service Management’ article here.

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Special Issue on Process Mining in Dutch IT Professionals Magazine ‘Informatie’

Dutch magazine 'Informatie' this month as a special issue over process mining!

One of the challenges we process mining enthusiasts are facing is to make more people aware of the fact that process mining even exists. That is why we speak at conferences, write articles, organize special interest groups, events — and special issues.

Special issues have a special magic — A whole volume about just process mining gives all of us the chance to look at this topic from new, and different, angles. It allows to not remain at the surface by just introducing and positioning the matter, but to go in-depth and explore multiple perspectives.

After the Novática monograph on process mining, there is now a special issue of the Dutch magazine Informatie (nr. 5 – 2014), edited by Wil van der Aalst and Frank van Geffen.

This special issue showcases a broad array of different applications of process mining, and Christian and myself are very proud that we could contribute to the issue as well. You can download the PDF of our article ‘Toegevoegde waarde van process mining’ here. This article is in Dutch, but if you don’t speak the language you can read an English version at BPTrends here.

The complete special issue is only available for members of the Dutch IT professionals association Ngi-NGN (if you become a member now, you will still get one). But Ngi-NGN was so kind to sponsor 100 issues for the attendees of Process Mining Camp last week. And because half the campers came from outside the Netherlands, we have a few magazines left. So, if you want one of these rare keepsakes you can send an email to anne@fluxicon.com and we will mail it to you.

[Update: All remaining magazines have been given away.]

This special issue of ‘Informatie’ is a great success of the new Special Interest Group (SIG) Process Mining in the Ngi-NGN, which initiated this edition. At the SIG1 we also organize events around process mining and support members who want to share their knowledge and experience.

If you don’t have a special interest group on process mining in your region yet, why don’t you start one? Get in touch with us, and we will help you get started!


  1. where Fluxicon is also a board member 
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Livestream at Process Mining Camp!

Process Mining Camp 2014

Were you among the disappointed who did not get a ticket for Process Mining Camp this year, because it sold out so quickly? Or would you have loved to come but simply can’t make the trip to the Netherlands?

We have something for you!

For the first time, we will try to live-stream the Process Mining Camp. This means that you can follow the event live in the Internet while it takes place. There are some technical questions that remain open, so we are not yet 100% sure it will work, but let’s have a try and see how it goes!

So, how can you join?

  1. Take a look at the program to decide which talks you would like to see (use this timezone converter to check your local times for the camp schedule)
  2. At the time of the event, simply visit the regular Process Mining Camp website. We will embed the livestream at the top of the page, where you can then watch the program right in your browser.

Again, please don’t be disappointed if it does not work and expect the quality not to be great. But we will do our best and are excited that we can invite you all in.

See you at camp!

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Process Mining Camp 2014 — Fireside Chat with Erik Davelaar

Process Mining Camp Tickets are sold out this year but why don’t you sign up for the Process Mining Camp email list? You will receive the links to the slides from the speakers and to the video recordings of the talks as soon as they become available. And you will be the first to know when the registration opens for next year.

As a warm-up for camp, we have asked some of the speakers for an up-front interview. Previously, we have already spoken with Frank van Geffen from the Rabobank, with Johan Lammers from the Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek, with Shaun Moran from Customer Dimension Analytics, Antonio Valle from G2, Nicholas Hartman from CKM Advisors, and John Müller from ING.

Erik Davelaar

Today, you can read the last interview with Erik Davelaar.

Erik is IT auditor at KPMG and at camp he will share his experience about how process mining fits into the auditing and compliance practice.




Interview with Erik

Anne: Hi Erik, thank you for sharing your experiences at camp! You are specializing on process mining in the IT audit area. How well-known is process mining among auditors today?

Erik: Hello Anne, thank you for having me. The past year I have been trying to convince our audit colleagues of the added value of process mining. After a number of pilots in the leasing sector and one at a mortgage provider we have convinced our audit colleagues at our financial sector clients of the added value.

This year we will use process mining at almost all our relevant financial sector clients. However we also have a large client base in the corporate clients sector. In this sector we have not yet used process mining. At the moment we are exploring the possibilities to use process mining at these clients. So the auditors in the financial sector are well aware of the possibilities of process mining, but we need to convince a lot more colleagues in other sectors.

Anne: Right! From your experience in all these projects in the financial sector, who is benefitting more from process mining and why: the auditor or the auditee?

Erik: That is kind of hard to say, it depends a bit on the client and the case.

For the auditor one of the biggest benefits is that they get a higher degree of assurance during the audit. Instead of using just a sample of 25 of the cases, all cases of the year are analyzed.

The biggest benefit for the auditee is that the audit is more efficient and fewer resources of the organization are needed during the audit.

There are more benefits for both the auditor and the auditee, but I will discuss these more in-depth during my presentation at the camp.

Anne: Excellent, thank you. We are looking forward to your talk and see you tomorrow at camp!


Come to Process Mining Camp!

Process Mining Camp takes place on 18 June in Eindhoven! Tickets are sold out for this year’s camp but why don’t you sign up for the camp email list? You will receive the links to the video recordings of the talks, and you will be the first to know when the registration opens for next year…

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Process Mining Camp 2014 — Fireside Chat with John Müller 1

Process Mining Camp Tickets are sold out this year but why don’t you sign up for the Process Mining Camp email list? You will receive the links to the slides from the speakers and to the video recordings of the talks as soon as they become available. And you will be the first to know when the registration opens for next year.

As a warm-up for camp, we have asked some of the speakers for an up-front interview. Previously, we have already spoken with Frank van Geffen from the Rabobank, with Johan Lammers from the Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek, with Shaun Moran from Customer Dimension Analytics, Antonio Valle from G2, and Nicholas Hartman from CKM Advisors.

John Müller

Today, you can read the interview with John Müller.

John is a data scientist at ING bank and will give a practice talk about how he helped to improve the customer experience at ING Australia with process mining.




Interview with John

Anne: Hi John, you came across a use case for process mining that will be very interesting for many people at camp: The analysis of the customer journey path on a website before the customer calls the help desk. Can you tell us a bit about that moment when you realized that process mining was a solution for the problem you were facing and why?

John: First of all thank you for the invite. I’m honored to be invited. I came across the idea to use process mining already some months into my analysis. I was struggling with giving back the right kind of visualization of my analysis to the business user, I had tried the more traditional ways of plotting some things in R or some graphs in Excel but none of those options came close to my dream of giving something back to the business user where I could empower him to find his own answers to his questions.

We discussed how best to approach this when it hit me that this entire analysis could be seen as a customer journey or process if you will. Just because a website has no specific order in which people have to click didn’t mean it wasn’t fit to use process mining.

There was a clear start; the login, a clear middle, the switch to the call center and a clear end; hopefully a satisfied customer hanging up. The Disco tool by Fluxicon gave me the chance to give the preprocessed logs back to the business user and let him explore his own process and find his own answers, thus using his domain knowledge to the fullest.

Anne: That is so good to hear, because this is exactly what we are trying to do: Making process mining accessible for the people who have the domain knowledge about the process! Do you have an example of where they could find something in their process that you had completely missed when you looked at the same data yourself before?

John: I would actually put it the other way around, being able to visualize the data in such a powerful way opened up my eyes to how many things I had not seen when exploring the data by myself.

I had noticed a few recurring patterns of parts of the website that seemed to be causes of calls, but there would have been simply no way of finding all the relevant parts without a significant time investment in getting to know the domain.

To put it differently, the use of such a powerful tool for exploration allowed me and the business user to explore the data without having to think of specific questions to ask up front. No longer was the question something like “How many customers called about account opening that also visited the how to open an account page”, but it had turned into “It looks like a large percentage of clients had visited the interest page before calling, let’s do a deep dive there”.

Anne: Right! So it changed the way questions were asked? Because they did not need to know all the questions upfront?

John: Exactly! We could now go in with a blank slate, letting the data show us where to look next. We could start off by just looking at all the different ways the website was used before any sort of call and then base our next step off of the interesting-looking patterns.

Obviously not everything that we could see at first glance was shocking and new. For example, quite unsurprisingly a lot of customers logged in and clicked on the contact us page right before calling, but by combining the domain knowledge of the business user with process mining we were able to quickly spot unexpected patterns as well as confirm his suspicions about failing parts of the website. The latter part might not sound very exciting but this was the first time that these kind of suspicions were backed up by numbers at short notice, providing them with solid facts to convince other parts of the bank to act.

Anne: Fantastic, it will be great to hear more about this in your talk. Thanks a lot for making the time for this chat and see you at camp on Wednesday!


Come to Process Mining Camp!

Process Mining Camp takes place on 18 June in Eindhoven! Tickets are sold out for this year’s camp but why don’t you sign up for the camp email list? You will receive the links to the video recordings of the talks, and you will be the first to know when the registration opens for next year…

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Process Mining Camp 2014 — Fireside Chat with Nicholas Hartman

As a warm-up for Process Mining Camp, we have asked some of the speakers for an up-front interview. Previously, we have already spoken with Frank van Geffen from the Rabobank, with Johan Lammers from the Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek, with Shaun Moran from Customer Dimension Analytics, and Antonio Valle from G2.

Nicholas Hartman

Today, you can read the interview with Nicholas Hartman.

Nick is director of CKM Advisors and will give a practice talk and a workshop about process mining in the context of other data science tools at camp.




Interview with Nick

Anne: Hi Nick, thank you for coming over from New York for Process Mining Camp! I can see from your twitter feed that CKM are putting lots of efforts into recruiting data scientists. What do you think is it that makes the job of a data scientist attractive for students?

Nick: Hi Anne. I’m really looking forward to the trip and meeting others within the process mining community.

It’s increasingly common for graduates to move into, and be very successful in, fields that were not directly related to their college or graduate studies. The students we encounter are keen to ensure that that their first steps into the ‘real world’ open even more doors for career options down the line.

A decade ago, management consultancy was often viewed as the main path for getting rapid exposure across sectors before settling down in a particular area. Today for many top candidates, and particularly for those from a science or math background, data science offers a better opportunity to both get that breadth of exposure to business challenges but also utilize and expand upon the technical skill-sets that interest these individuals. As a rapidly expanding field there are certainly a lot of opportunities to continue longer term advancing through data science. However, even those that end up moving horizontally after a few years will still possess the base of skills required to succeed in the data-driven economy of the future.

We also see a lot of top candidates that want to make sure they don’t want to end up as the ‘smartest person in the room.’ Rather, they want to feel like they’re a part of a team of people where everyone can contribute to the problem being solved while also constantly learning new skills from each other. That sort of communal collaborative atmosphere is really at the core of the data science community, and it’s certainly something that today’s graduates find attractive.

Anne: Yes, I can also recognize the mix of business and technical challenges as something that attracts people to process mining. As a field, it lies somewhere between information systems and computer science. So, interesting algorithms can be applied to very relevant problems in today’s companies. This is really exciting.

And you are absolutely right, community is very important. The process mining community is still quite small but an enthusiastic one. Do you think it has a place in the wider data science community now? Should it have a place there? How do you see the relationship?

Nick: Absolutely, process mining is a core component of data science. In fact, for most of the business applications of data science that we’re seeing some element of process mining is a major contributor.

One of the great things about the processing mining movement is that it’s focused directly on applying data to solve relevant issues that matter to stakeholders–the process owners. The broader data science, or dare I say “big data,” movement is often guilty of focusing too too much on tools and too little on developing actionable output with those tools. A focus on process mining as part of an organization’s data science initiative helps ensure that the data science team and its technical assets are focused on delivering output that will have a measurable impact for stakeholders.

In return, the broader data science community can help process miners in conducting analytics on increasingly large and unwieldy datasets, and connecting process data to other information that can help tell a more complete story. Basic process mining can be performed on a single system audit-log file, but increasingly we’re seeing stakeholders asking for things like text analytics to be layered on top of the process mining. These sorts of challenges require close collaboration between a diverse set of data scientists that can bring together these complementary skill sets.

Anne: Right! Next to your practice talk, where you will present two case studies, you will also give a workshop about data science tools that are commonly used together with process mining. What can participants expect from this workshop at camp?

Nick: I’ll start by presenting an overview of the the main steps we typically follow–from data ingestion and storage through to presentation–when completing a project and will highlight popular tools that are used by data scientists to facilitate those processes. In each of these areas I’ll pull from examples of our project work to describe things to consider with different tools, languages and services. There are currently no end-to-end data science solutions available, which means that skilled data scientists will need to integrate an appropriate collection of tools to deliver a successful analytics implementation.

The later half of the workshop will focus on going deeper into a few use cases of such tools, including text mining and automated ingestion of data into an analytics environment for process monitoring.

I’ll conclude with some suggestions on places to get started both in terms of experimenting with tools and getting access to useful test data. It’s certainly a lot to cover, but I hope there will be something new for everyone in the session. I’m also looking forward to learning through the discussions we have amongst the group.

Anne: Thanks, Nick! We look forward to having you at camp next week!


Come to Process Mining Camp!


Process Mining Camp takes place on 18 June in Eindhoven! Tickets are sold out right but you can still sign up and be notified if more ticket should become available…

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Process Mining Camp 2014 — Fireside Chat with Antonio Valle Salas

As a warm-up for Process Mining Camp, we have asked some of the speakers for an up-front interview. Previously, we have already spoken with Frank van Geffen from the Rabobank, with Johan Lammers from the Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek, and with Shaun Moran from Customer Dimension Analytics.

Antonio Valle

Today, you can read the interview with Antonio Valle Salas. Antonio is director of G2 and heading the itSMF division of Spain.

At camp, Antonio will give a workshop on ‘Process Mining and Lean’.




Interview with Antonio

Anne: Hi Antonio, thanks for doing the ‘Process Mining and Lean’ workshop at Process Mining Camp this year. I know this is a topic that is interesting for many people. What is your own history with lean? Do you still remember how you came in contact with it?

Antonio: Hi Anne; first of all, let me thank you and the rest of the Process Mining Camp organization for the opportunity to conduct this workshop.

Lean has been a hot topic in different areas for at least the latest 20 years, but in the ITSM industry it all started just five to seven years ago. Back in 2008 when I founded G2 intending to work around new ideas and technologies, Lean was one of those concepts I wanted to apply to IT Service Management practices. Then I was invited by Jan van Bon to attend the Best Practices in ITSM conference in Ede, NL and there I met Ian M. Clayton. He was presenting his developments around Lean and the Service Management practices (he had recently published his USMBOK reference guide and he was working to incorporate lean thinking to it). In 2009 I had the opportunity to collaborate with the team who organized the itSMF Catalunya conference and I invited Ian M. Clayton as a keynote speaker. That was my first contact with Lean Service Management and the concepts that would be coined later as Lean-IT.

Ian had created a complete set of practices adapted from Lean to the service sector, what he calls Lean Service Management. Those ideas deeply impacted me so I managed to convince him to stay a few more days in Barcelona to teach a small group of about 15 people in LSM. We were the first Certified Lean Service Professional certificates in Europe. But knowledge cannot be transmitted just by teaching: you must do it before you can learn it (as Taiichi Ohnno once said: “Teaching means to teach something unknown. Training means to repeatedly practice something you know until your body remembers it”) so we added Lean to G2’s portfolio of services and started helping our customers to adopt Lean concepts…

And that’s the beginning of the story…

Anne: Nice! I like the distinction of teaching vs. training. Teaching the concepts is important. At the same time we are constantly thinking about how we can help people practice their process mining skills in the best possible ways.

But back to lean: I am curious how you see the adoption of lean at the moment. Is it everywhere? Or just at the big companies? And does everyone know about the concepts? It’s one of the challenges for process mining that you still have to explain first what it is practically everywhere you go.

Antonio: Well, it depends on which sector you are considering. In manufacturing it is very common, but not so in offices or services. Keep in mind that the first books related to Lean applied to IT services are dated on 2005 so it is a relatively new industry for Lean. But even in IT we have a very special case: during the 80’s and the 90’s a new kind of development methods appeared and gained traction in the community; in 2001 they were given the name of agile methods. Now these methods are used everywhere and are in fact an implementation of the Lean thinking and its core values to the development teams. Exactly in the same way it happened to the manufacturing sector, developers have started to see the flow of value towards the customer through a wider perspective and now we are seeing the rise of a completely new application of Lean principles to IT: the DevOps movement.

So, to answer the initial question: if you want to talk Lean, you must explain the concepts almost everywhere you go outside the manufacturing sector, especially in IT. But if you use Lean core principles in your conversation, people quickly map them to their current practices.

Anne: Interesting. Now, how do you see the relation of process mining and lean, and what can people expect from the workshop?

Antonio: That is where the magic starts. Lean is all about value and flow and flow means value moving from the beginning of the production process towards the customer. No matter if you are working in a manufacturing plant, a hospital or an IT service provider: flow represents the movement of value towards the customer.

Then comes process mining, a technology specialized in discovering and analysing what I call “change over time”: no matter what an entity is changing, process mining can discover it and then map and analyse how it is changing over time.

And how can you define “movement”? :-) As as “change over time”, so process mining is the perfect technology to discover, represent, and analyse flow if the required conditions are met.

During the Lean workshop in the Process Mining Camp I expect to create a dialogue environment where we can discuss about the main challenges that attendants are finding in their lean initiatives and how process mining can help, so everybody can go back home with a set of new ideas to apply from the first day. It will be a guided but participative workshop where all attendants can share ideas and experiences.

Anne: Thanks, Antonio! It will be great to have you here next week!


Come to Process Mining Camp!


Process Mining Camp takes place on 18 June in Eindhoven! Tickets are sold out right but you can still sign up and be notified if more ticket should become available…

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Process Mining Camp 2014 — Fireside Chat with Shaun Moran 1

Process Mining Camp tickets are sold out now and people are coming to Eindhoven from 16 different countries! As a warm-up for camp, we have asked some of the speakers for an up-front interview. Previously, we have already spoken with Frank van Geffen from the Rabobank and with Johan Lammers from the Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek.

Shaun Moran

Today, you can read the interview with Shaun Moran. Shaun is the founder of Customer Dimension Analytics and previously was working in various customer experience roles at eBay.

At camp, Shaun will give a workshop on ‘Process mining and customer experience’.


Interview with Shaun

Anne: Hi Shaun, thanks for coming over to Eindhoven for the workshop! You have been working in customer experience management for quite a while now. Which kind of roles have you had there and what exactly should we think of when we are talking about customer processes?

Shaun: Hi Anne, It’s really great to be here again, this is my 2nd Process Mining Camp and I am really looking forward to it. The role I perform can vary from project to project in terms of function, but it always centres around a core theme – that of closing the loop between the customers experience of what they have gone thru and the methods employed by the service provider to deliver that experience. So my role goes from working with clients to map out high level customer journeys to walking the shop floor to understand process steps that do not even touch the customer directly, but the output of which will have an effect on them.

All processes should have a customer and the customer should define what is an acceptable level of quality, and while that is quite straight forward for a product offering it can become quite abstract in terms of a service one. When thinking about Customer Experience the important thing to think about is perspective — starting with the customer and their experience and then connecting it to the process that produced it. Process is about outputs, experience is about outcomes.

Anne: Exactly. I mean we all know how frustrating it is to get a bad service, like being an hour in a phone queue at your telecom provider, for example. At the same time I see all these satisfaction surveys popping up over the web, which I don’t really care about until something is wrong. Do you see a mismatch, or inability of the companies to provide feedback channels where it matters? Or is it not about feedback channels at all — What does it take for a company to provide excellent customer service?

Shaun: Some companies take the wrong approach — they see the channel itself as the solution to any problems the customer is having. It is not the solution (though some channels are better for certain types of issues than others), it is the only medium by which the message is communicated.

Process defects elsewhere in the system are the cause of the problems. Connecting the customer message back to the process in a dimensional way is the first step in improving customer experience.

Improving customer experience is about strengthening your relationship with customers, but first you need to understand the customer experience.

For example, let’s take the results of customer satisfaction surveys and how they are utilised; Often they are aggregated to a departmental level and reported out to the department manager with the expectation that they fix it. In many situations this is not reasonable as the department is dealing with contacts arising from defects in processes that they have no control over. But more importantly, the context to be able to understand this has not been created. Their reporting capabilities for both transactional and survey data only provides them with a vertical and silo perspective.

One of the fundamentals for excellent customer service is the ability to have an objective ‘end- to end’ view — Process Mining is a key enabler of that.

Anne: So, the results of the customer satisfaction survey are going to a different department than the department that could do something about this customer experience? Can you give an example of how an end-to-end view of the process could change that?

Shaun: Just think of any customer service centre handling Insurance claims for example.

Broadly speaking, the end to end view is the core process by which the customer registers, takes out a policy and makes a claim should something go wrong. When the surveys are issued to the customer they are done so in relation to a contact that they have made to the service centre. However the reason for the contact may have a root cause further upstream within the core process, leading to a gap in the customers mind between their expectation of the service and the perception of what they have received.

For example, perhaps some levy is applied to any refund and the amount was never clearly communicated to the policy holder at the time of making the policy but only when they opened a claim. This could, for some customers, be a bad experience. The service centre is seen as the fix when the solution is in how the core process is executed. The end to end view connects the voice of the customer to the core process as allows companies to localise issues in relation to the core process that deliver their value proposition to the market.

Anne: OK, great. We are all looking forward to hearing more about that at camp!


Come to Process Mining Camp!


Process Mining Camp takes place on 18 June in Eindhoven! Tickets are sold out and the waiting list is pretty full, but you can still sign up and be notified if more ticket should become available…

There are 1 comments for this article.
Process Mining Camp 2014 — Fireside Chat with Johan Lammers 3

As a warm-up for Process Mining Camp, we asked some of the speakers for an up-front interview. Camp tickets have been sold out now, but if you did not get one you can still sign up for the waiting list and we will notify you if seats become available. Let’s get ready for camp!

Johan Lammers

Previously, we already spoke with Frank van Geffen from the Rabobank.

Today, you can read the interview with Johan Lammers. Johan has been a business analyst and statistical researcher for almost 30 years and will give a practice talk at camp about his experience with process mining at the Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek in the Netherlands.

Interview with Johan

Anne: Hi Johan, I have this booklet here – produced by the Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek – with a nice collection of all kinds of statistics about the Dutch society. I never really thought about the fact that there are processes behind making such statistics. How important are processes at the CBS in general?

Johan: Hello Anne, in our business, processes have two faces: You can produce statistics about processes and processes are needed to produce statistics. The ‘Statistics’ tab in Disco gives an impression of the statistics you can produce. Our office is governmental and we use public finances. The efficiency and the effectiveness of our processes is important to spend that money well.

Anne: Right! So, the CBS is involved in process improvement initiatives? Can you give us an overview about the kinds of processes that you can find at CBS?

Johan: Our main ‘production line’ has three steps: Collection, analysis and publication. As we produce information (statistics), our main material is data. Data about lots of subjects in our society: Persons, enterprises, goods, services, cars, roads, etc. In order to produce, we have to design. This involves the design of the production process and of the methodology. A huge part of our processes is automated, manual intervention only applies when relevant for the quality of our products.

Anne: Yes, I can imagine. The main part simply must be automated to deal with the massive amounts of data that I imagine must be coming your way. Speaking of big data, I have seen more concerns recently about the validity of correlations that people find in data (or better, the causation they imply), illustrated, for example, by a statistically significant correlation between the divorce rate and the per capita consumption of margarine. As a statistics practitioner, are you worried about how people are using statistics today?

Johan: I’m ambiguous towards his question. On the one hand it’s a good sign that people are willing to use statistics. The trap is to rely solely on this source. The methodology to create reliable statistics is quite complex. Available tooling tends to make it more and more easy. It’s essential to apply a good share of common sense though. The development of data science is very important to create valuable knowledge with an appropriate role for statistics. In my opinion, process mining contributes to this development.

Anne: Absolutely, I completely agree. And I am sure that we will see more awareness for methodology and more maturity in the field over time. Thanks a lot for making the time for this chat. We are all very curious to hear more about your process mining experiences at camp!


Come to Process Mining Camp!

Would you like to hear more from Johan about his experiences? Are you interested in sharing first-hand knowledge with fellow process miners?
Sign up now for the waiting list for Process Mining Camp on 18 June in Eindhoven. A few more tickets might become available…

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Process Mining News – June 2014

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Every 1-2 months, we create this list of collected process mining web links and events in the process mining news (now also on the blog, with extra material in the e-mail edition).

Fluxicon Articles

Here are some blog articles that you may have missed:

The preparations for this year's Process Mining Camp are in full swing. Sign up fast because there are only a dozen or so tickets left! Read the up-front interview with the speaker Frank van Geffen from the Rabobank. 

Our article on The Added Value of Process Mining has been published at the popular Business Process Trends platform BPTrends. Read the article see what the typical use cases for process mining are, and who exactly can benefit from process mining in your organization. 

The BPI Challenge, the annual process mining competition, features a separate student track this year for the first time. Here are a few tips for you to get started

Vladimir Rubin contributed this case study on Process Mining for Analyzing Software Processes. Read the article to see how (1) process mining can be used to better understand the user behavior and (2) how developers can obtain information about system failures. 

Walter Vanherle shares his success story of how process mining was used to improve the intervention management process at a security services company. Despite a challenging data set, very relevant insights about value leakage could be given from the analysis.

Process Mining on the Web

Here are some pointers to new process mining discussions and articles on the web, in no particular order:

Non-English language:

Event Calendar

To make sure you are not missing anything, here is a list of the upcoming process mining events we are aware of. 

Training Calendar

Do you want to quick-start your own process mining initiatives? Sign up for one of our monthly process mining trainings in Eindhoven

The latest process mining trainings were all sold out and the participants really liked what they got. For example, Tiese attended our training on 23 May and here is what he said about it: 

There are now new training dates available for the rest of the year:  

We have a very limited number of seats available, since we want to keep the training groups small, intimate, and productive. Sign up now, and reserve your spot!

Would you like to share a process mining-related pointer to an article, event, or discussion? Let us know about it!

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